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November 28, 2005

Why the mathematics of congestion pricing don't work

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Posted by Dominic Basulto

Over at Tech Central Station, Johan Wennström argues that a congestion pricing scheme for traffic in New York City would become an unwelcome burden for New Yorkers. Pointing to examples from London and Stockholm, where congestion pricing schemes are already a fact of life, Wennström makes the case against congestion pricing:

"Is this really something for the Capital of the World? Manhattan is still recovering from 9/11. This is perhaps the worst time to carry through a system that would be a burden to New Yorkers...

On the eve of Bloomberg's re-election, he proclaimed that New York is back in business after the World Trade Center attacks. Why make it harder for the city to recover by imposing a toll system which, if following the international pattern, will only hurt merchants and consumers alike?"

Comments (3) + TrackBacks (1) | Category: Government


COMMENTS

1. dave on November 28, 2005 03:37 PM writes...

> This is perhaps the worst time to carry through a
> system that would be a burden to New Yorkers...

It's not a burden to New Yorkers..It's a burden to people who live outside NYC and want to drive in, consuming a disproportionate amount of resources (ie space on the road).

I'm in favor of taxing drivers entry into Manhattan and using the funds to improve public transportation, which helps everybody move around quicker and reduces air pollution

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2. Dave J on February 18, 2006 10:18 AM writes...

Agreed with previous Dave, it's not a burden on New Yorkers, unless you're a retailer, or someone who shops in the same stores as out-of-towners. The article essentially says the same.

It's a RELIEF to New Yorkers who have to deal with overcrowded streets, no parking, double-parked cars blocking roads, honking, and the like.

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3. Lindsay on March 15, 2006 01:07 PM writes...

The thought that a toll would negatively affect retailers makes sense, but in reality it probably would have little impact. There's a great article about taxing NYC drivers in Transportation Alternatives, Vol. 11, No. 3. It says that since London drivers have had to pay the $9 toll to enter the city, "the number of vehicles entering Central London has decreased 18% and traffic delays have decreased 30%. Significantly and favorably, the number of actual people entering London's center only decreased by 2%. ... Other Benefits of the change: bicycling has increased 67%, London's air is cleaner, traffic noise has decreased and buses are running faster."

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